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10 exercises GMAT word problem: proportion, ratio, rate, range

proportion, ratio, rate, range 1. 15 Java programmers, working in a constant pace, finish a web page in 3 days. If after one day, 9 programmers quit, how many more days are needed to finish the remainder of the job? (a) 5. (b) 2. (c) 8. (d) 4. (e) 6. 2. Two carpenters, working in the same pace, can build 2 desks in two hours and a half. How many desks can 4 carpenters build in 4 hours? (a) 2.4. (b) 3.6. (c) 4.2. (d) 5.5. (e) 6.4 3.- . There are 40 students in a classroom, 9/20 of them are (…)


Problem Solving Word Problems

Six Cambridge academics elected to prestigious British Academy fellowship

They are among 76 distinguished scholars to be elected to the fellowship in recognition of their work in the fields of archaeology, history, law, politics and prison reform.

The Cambridge academics made Fellows of the Academy this year are:

  • Christopher Evans (Department of Archaeology) is to be elected to the fellowship in recognition of his work on some of the most important archaeological field projects undertaken in this country since the growth of development-led archaeology
  • Professor Martin Jones (Department of Archaeology) is to be elected to the fellowship in recognition of his work in the field of in the field of archaeobotany
  • Professor Joya Chatterji (Faculty of History) is to be elected to the fellowship in recognition of her work on South Asian history, specifically the history of the India/Pakistan Partition of 1947
  • Professor Brian Cheffins (Faculty of Law) is to be elected to the fellowship in recognition of his work on the application of economic analysis to the area of company law
  • Professor David Runciman (Department of Politics and International Studies) is to be elected to the fellowship in recognition of his work on the history of political thought (from Hobbes through to late nineteenth and twentieth century political thought); theories of the state and political representation; and contemporary politics and political theory
  • Professor Alison Liebling (Director of the Prisons Research Centre) is to be elected to the fellowship in recognition of her work on studying prisons, specifically the internal social order of prisons.

They join the British Academy, a community of over 1400 of the leading minds that make up the UK’s national academy for the humanities and social sciences. Current Fellows include the classicist Dame Mary Beard, the historian Sir Simon Schama and philosopher Baroness Onora O’Neill, while previous Fellows include Sir Winston Churchill, C.S Lewis, Seamus Heaney and Beatrice Webb.

Christopher Evans said: “As having something of a renegade academic status, I am only delighted and honoured to be elected to the Academy.”

Professor Martin Jones said: “It is a real privilege to join the Academy at a time when the humanities and social sciences have more to offer society than ever before.”

This year marks the largest ever cohort of new Fellows elected to the British Academy for their distinction in the humanities and social sciences.

As well as a fellowship, the British Academy is a funding body for research, nationally and internationally, and a forum for debate and engagement.

Professor Sir David Cannadine, President of the British Academy, said: “I am delighted to welcome this year’s exceptionally talented new Fellows to the Academy. Including historians and economists, neuroscientists and legal theorists, they bring a vast range of expertise, insights and experience to our most distinguished fellowship.

“The election of the largest cohort of Fellows in our history means the British Academy is better placed than ever to help tackle the challenges we all face today. Whether it’s social integration or the ageing society, the future of democracy or climate change, Brexit or the rise of artificial intelligence, the insights of the humanities and social sciences are essential as we navigate our way through an uncertain present into what we hope will be an exciting future.

“I extend to all of our new Fellows my heartiest congratulations and I look forward to working closely with them to build on the Academy’s reputation and achievements.”

Quantitative question, data sufficiency GMAT: Is the largest of 7 consecutive numbers odd?

Is the largest of 7 consecutive numbers odd?

(1) The product of the seven numbers is zero.

(2) The sum of the seven numbers is zero.

(a)Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.

(b)Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.

(c)Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.

(d)Either statement (…)


Data Sufficiency

Exercises GMAT data sufficiency: 990 people went to the GMAT exam, how many boys didn’t pass the test?

990 people went to the GMAT exam, how many boys didn’t pass the test?

(1) 321 girls didn’t pass the test, which is the number of boys that did.

(2) One fifth of the people that went to the GMAT exam were boys who eventually didn’tpass the test.

(a)Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.

(b)Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.

(c)Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are (…)


Data Sufficiency

QUANTITATIVE QUESTION gmat data sufficiency: Is there an intersection between the line (Y = aX – b) and the parabola (Y = X2 + b)?

Is there an intersection between the line (Y = aX – b) and the parabola

(Y = X2 + b)?

(1) a < 0.

(2) 0 > b.

(a)Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.

(b)Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.

(c)Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.

(d)Either statement BY ITSELF is (…)


Data Sufficiency

GMAT QUESTION, data Sufficiency: Is the intersection of the two lines: (x + y = 8) and (4y – 4x = 16) inside the circle: x2 + y2 = r2?

Is the intersection of the two lines: (x + y = 8) and (4y – 4x = 16) inside the circle: x2 + y2 = r2?

(1) r = 81.

(2) The center of the circle is at the coordinate (-99, -99).

(a)Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.

(b)Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.

(c)Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though NEITHER statement BY (…)


Data Sufficiency

Data Sufficiency GMAT, exercises: If X and Y are positive integers, is X greater than Y?

If X and Y are positive integers, is X greater than Y?

(1) X > 2.

(2) Y < 3.

(a)Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.

(b)Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.

(c)Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.

(d)Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question. (…)


Data Sufficiency

GMAT Exercises Data Sufficiency: Resolved If X and Y are positive integers, is X greater than Y?

If X and Y are positive integers, is X greater than Y?

(1) X > Y – 2.

(2) X > 2.

(a)Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.

(b)Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.

(c)Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.

(d)Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question. (…)


Data Sufficiency

Consider a Part-Time MBA — Or a European MBA Program!

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - Consider a Part-Time MBA — Or a European MBA Program! by mbaMission

Taking the GRE for your business school application? You’re in luck. Each month, we are featuring a series of admission tips from our exclusive admissions consulting partner, mbaMission.


We at mbaMission often receive questions about part-time MBA programs, so we thought we should offer a look at some of the pros and cons of this option.

As for the pros, the one that business school candidates cite most frequently is that the part-time MBA involves a limited opportunity cost. Unlike a full-time MBA student, a part-time MBA student does not miss out on two years of salary (and, in some cases, retirement savings) and can still earn raises and promotions while completing his/her studies. Furthermore, firm sponsorship seems to be more prevalent for part-time MBA students, so candidates who have this option can truly come out ahead, with a free education and continued earning throughout.

Beyond the financial rationale, many part-time MBA students see an academic advantage; they can learn both in the classroom and at work and can then turn theory into practice (and vice versa) in real time, on an ongoing basis. Of course, a cynic might add that another pro is that part-time MBA programs are generally less selective. So a candidate who may have had difficulty getting accepted to a traditional two-year program may have a better chance of gaining admission to a well-regarded school in its part-time program instead.

As for the cons, many part-time MBA candidates feel that the comparative lack of structure means that networking opportunities within the class are limited. While one part-time MBA student could complete a school’s MBA program in two years, another might complete it in five. As a result, with candidates progressing through the program at such different paces, students will not likely see each other regularly in the same classes or at social events. In addition, in a traditional MBA environment, academics always come first; in a part-time MBA environment, work typically comes first, and academics must come second or even third, after family. In other words, the full-time program generally involves greater intensity with regard to the classroom experience, given that it is the focal point of students’ lives. Another thing to consider is that some programs do not offer their “star” faculty to part-time MBA students—something that candidates should definitely ask about before enrolling—and offer limited access to on-grounds recruiting.

Of course, we are not trying to offer a definitive “answer” or present a bias for a particular kind of program; we are simply sharing some objective facts for candidates to consider as they make informed choices for themselves.

MBA candidates looking to broaden their business school choices could also consider European MBA programs.

Although many applicants who are competing for places at the top U.S. business schools are well aware of the strengths of the MBA programs at INSEAD and London Business School, even more options are available beyond these two, including IESE, ESADE, Oxford (Said), and Cambridge (Judge). These four schools in particular have been aggressively playing “catch-up” with their better-known brethren by raising funds and dedicating them to scholarships and to enhancing their global brands. Those who know their business schools are also aware that IMD offers a boutique MBA program with remarkable international diversity, very highly-regarded academics, and a stellar reputation with international employers.

So, numerous options are available, and each can be explored on its own academic merit. But is earning your MBA in Europe, in itself, a good choice for you? For many, the key issue in determining this is where they would like to be after completing their education. If you are seeking to work in Europe, then clearly, these schools offer an advantage over all but the top five or six schools in the United States—Harvard Business School, for example, can probably open as many doors in Europe as INSEAD can. However, if you are seeking to work in the States, then the European schools will not provide the pipeline of opportunities that a top-ranked American school could provide, particularly for those who hope to work in a niche industry or with a company that is not a well-known international brand.

Still, beyond the employment picture, studying abroad offers intrinsic value. Spending two years in London, Fontainebleau, or Lausanne could certainly be its own reward. 📝


For more information on various international business schools, including INSEAD, Cambridge Judge, and IMD, check out the free mbaMission Program Primers.


Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - mbaMission LogombaMission is the leader in MBA admissions consulting with a full-time and comprehensively trained staff of consultants, all with profound communications and MBA experience. mbaMission has helped thousands of candidates fulfill their dream of attending prominent MBA programs around the world. Take your first step toward a more successful MBA application experience with a free 30-minute consultation with one of mbaMission’s senior consultants. Click here to sign up today.

The post Consider a Part-Time MBA — Or a European MBA Program! appeared first on GRE.

Fuente https://www.manhattanprep.com

proportion, ratio, rate, range, eXERCISES gmat. There are 40 students in a classroom, 9/20 of them are boys and 4/5 of them are right-handed. How many right-handed boys are there in the classroom?

There are 40 students in a classroom, 9/20 of them are boys and 4/5 of them are right-handed. How many right-handed boys are there in the classroom?

(a) Between 10 and 32.

(b) Between 14 and 32.

(c) Between 10 and 18.

(d) Between 14 and 18.

(e) Between 18 and 36.


Problem Solving Word Problems

Pluralize Nouns and Vary Sentence Length in Your Application Essays

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - Pluralize Nouns and Vary Sentence Length in Your Application Essays by mbaMission

One way to conserve words in your application essays and short-answer responses is by pluralizing nouns whenever possible. Singular words often require an article such as “a,” “an,” or “the.” These words can add unnecessarily to your word count, thereby cluttering your page without contributing to your argument or style. Consider the following example:

“A manager with an MBA can ascend the corporate ladder faster than a manager who lacks an MBA.” (18 words)

Now consider this version, in which many of the singular nouns have been pluralized:

“Managers with MBAs can ascend the corporate ladder faster than managers without MBAs.” (13 words)

As you can see, both sentences present the same idea, but one sentence is five words shorter than the other. Given that application essays can include dozens or even hundreds of sentences, pluralizing wherever possible is helpful in meeting word count requirements and decluttering the text.

Although decluttering your application essays is important, ensure that all of your sentences are not the same length. Many business school applicants use medium-length sentences (like this one) in their essays. Few use short sentences (like this one). Likewise, few use long sentences in their application essays, even though long sentences (like this one) can often play a useful role in an essay’s structure and story.

Confused? Consider the following example:

“At XYZ Inc., I was the manager in charge of leading a team of 12 staff members. Included in my team were four engineers, four marketing professionals, and four market analysts. Our goal was to develop a new thingamajig within six months. We worked really hard over the six months and succeeded. The new thingamajig is now on the market and is selling well. As a result of my efforts, I was promoted to vice president.”

All these sentences have approximately the same number of words and the same rhythm/cadence, making the paragraph fairly boring to read. Nothing changes—the structure just repeats itself over and over again, with one medium-length sentence following another medium-length sentence.

Now consider this example:*

“At XYZ Inc., I was the manager in charge of leading a thingamajig development team of 12 staff members, four of whom were engineers, four were marketing professionals, and four were market analysts. We had just six months to launch our new product. The team worked really hard and succeeded, and the new thingamajig is now on the market, where it is selling well. As a result of my efforts, I was promoted to vice president.”

The sentences in this paragraph are varied—the first is quite long, the second is very short, the third is medium-long, and the fourth is medium-short. Sentence variety makes for a much more interesting read, and one very short sentence in the middle of some longer ones can provide precisely the kind of contrast and drama that application essays so often need.

*Please note that this is a simplified example for illustration purposes. If this were an actual essay, we would encourage the applicant to offer greater insight into his/her experience launching the product. 📝


Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - mbaMission LogombaMission is the leader in MBA admissions consulting with a full-time and comprehensively trained staff of consultants, all with profound communications and MBA experience. mbaMission has helped thousands of candidates fulfill their dream of attending prominent MBA programs around the world. Take your first step toward a more successful MBA application experience with a free 30-minute consultation with one of mbaMission’s senior consultants. Click here to sign up today.

The post Pluralize Nouns and Vary Sentence Length in Your Application Essays appeared first on GRE.

Fuente https://www.manhattanprep.com

Word Problems GMAT QUANT Aaron will jog from home at x miles per hour and then walk back home on the same route at y miles per hour. How many miles from home can Aaron jog so that he spends a total of t hours jogging and walking?

Problem Solving GMAT QUANTITATIVE

Aaron will jog from home at x miles per hour and then walk back home on the same route at y miles per hour. How many miles from home can Aaron jog so that he spends a total of t hours jogging and walking?

A. xt/y

B. (x+t)/xy

C. xyt/(x+y)

D. (x+y+t)/xy

E. (y+t)/x-t/y

Te invitamos, haznos llegar tu respuesta a clasesgmatchile@gmail.com, con una pequeña explicaciòn, para comentarla y publicarla. (…)


Problem Solving Word Problems

Can You Ace GRE Quant if You’re Bad at Math? (Part 1)

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - Can You Ace GRE Quant if You're Bad at Math? (Part 1) by Chelsey Cooley

First, let’s get on the same page about what being “bad at math” really means. In my experience, GRE students who say that they’re bad at math tend to fall into these categories:

  1. People who don’t think math is interesting or fun.
  2. People who got bad grades in math as kids—or people who got good grades, but had to work harder than everybody else.
  3. People to whom math doesn’t feel natural or intuitive.
  4. People who feel anxious about math.

Instead of saying that you aren’t a math person, get specific. Which one of those groups describes you? Or, like many of my GRE students, do you fall into more than one of those categories? The more clearly you can describe the challenge you’re facing, the more power you have over it.

People Who Don’t Think Math is Interesting or Fun

It’s fine to think that math is boring—I think Reading Comprehension is soul-crushingly boring, and I’ve managed to make a career out of teaching the GRE. Learning to enjoy the GRE will make studying more fun, but I’ve also had a lot of successful students who thought of studying for the GRE as a boring but worthwhile job—or even as an annoying obstacle.

People Who Got Bad Grades in Math as Kids

As an adult learning middle-school and high-school math for the GRE, you’re in a strange position. You’re studying things that you once learned in grade-school math class. But you’re learning them from a totally different perspective: you’re smarter, more introspective, and have access to better resources. Getting bad grades in math as a kid says a lot about your middle-school math teacher, a little about your childhood level of patience and study skills, and not much at all about your “math aptitude.”

People to Whom Math Doesn’t Feel Natural or Intuitive

The idea that math should come naturally (or not at all!) is one of the nastiest myths in modern education. Math isn’t natural, and it isn’t intuitive. There’s actually a lot of evidence—which we’ll look at later in this article—that there’s no such thing as a “math person,” at least when it comes to GRE-level math.

Most people are more or less equally equipped to learn GRE math. But some people start the GRE process with more math experience, some people start out with more math confidence, and some people start out with both. Those people who seem to “get it” right away? It’s more likely that they’re just a little more familiar with the material than you are. Maybe they use math every day in their work; maybe they had a fantastic middle-school algebra teacher.

Think about it: when teachers and parents decide that a student is “good at math,” what do they do? They give them more and harder math to work on, creating a self-perpetuating cycle. Some people end up getting a lot of positive and varied experiences with math, which strengthens their abilities even further. The rest of us fall behind and focus on other topics.

People Who Feel Anxious about Math

A lot of us have had negative experiences with bad math teachers, bad grades, or seemingly impossible math problems. More of my students seem to have math anxiety than, say, “vocabulary anxiety”—probably because of the pervasive myth that some people are doomed to suck at math. Hopefully, by examining and rejecting that myth, you’ll find your anxiety being replaced by determination. Keep reading!

Bad at Math: The Evidence

This is the point where you stop saying that you’re “bad at math.” The language you use to describe yourself, even in your own head, makes a difference. It’s fine to say that you’re scared of math, or that you dislike math, or that you haven’t taken a math class in fifteen years, or that you absolutely hated your eighth-grade Algebra teacher. Those are facts! “Bad at math,” though, is a myth—here’s some evidence to prove that.

Here’s a chart summarizing the math performance of 15-year-olds around the world in 2012. If high-school math was always intuitive for some of us, and counterintuitive for others, we’d expect to see similar rates of high- and low-performers regardless of location. But the chart makes it clear that some ways of teaching and learning make almost everybody “good at math,” while other ways work for almost nobody. (So, why not sign up for GRE Math in a Day?)

There’s a common misconception, although fortunately it’s becoming less common as time goes on, that girls are naturally more likely to be bad at math than boys. But there are strong arguments to be made that this gap is completely explained by other factors, and when some of those factors are mitigated—as in single-sex schools—the gap begins to disappear.  

Twin studies have tried to determine whether mathematical ability is genetic. Here’s a study that leans more towards the “bad at math” side than what we’ve looked at so far. On the one hand, it suggests that genetics makes a “moderate” contribution to math ability at age 10. On the other hand, differences in mathematical ability due to social factors tend to be smaller for elementary school students than for older students—it’s possible that with older students, the pattern would change.

Finally, here’s one of my favorite articles addressing the “bad at math” issue. It contains a great description of where the “bad at math” myth comes from, and it’s worth a read just for that. It also introduces the idea that your beliefs about math influence how well you perform. People who believe that math ability can be improved, will improve! People who believe that they’re stuck where they are, won’t.

So, as you start or continue your GRE Quant studies, strive to convince yourself that you can get better at math. That belief alone may be enough to improve your performance. And remember that while you may feel anxious towards math or may dislike math, that won’t stop you from improving your Quant score. Want to know how to get better at Quant when you’re math-phobic? That’s coming up in the next article. 📝


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Chelsey CooleyChelsey Cooley Manhattan Prep GRE Instructor is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Seattle, Washington. Chelsey always followed her heart when it came to her education. Luckily, her heart led her straight to the perfect background for GMAT and GRE teaching: she has undergraduate degrees in mathematics and history, a master’s degree in linguistics, a 790 on the GMAT, and a perfect 170Q/170V on the GRE. Check out Chelsey’s upcoming GRE prep offerings here.

The post Can You Ace GRE Quant if You’re Bad at Math? (Part 1) appeared first on GRE.

Fuente https://www.manhattanprep.com