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Re: Approximately what percent of the total average

This is a tough question and the explanation above is correc t but badly formulated.

We have to use the chart and the graph, both.

1) Starting from the chart we do have that retirees spend 23% of meats, poultry, and seafood (consumed at home) but this 3 categories are included in a vast category of household expenditures which, as it turns out, comprises of: food at home. food away from home, personal cares items and housekeeping.

2) Now look at the chart: the bar at the outermost right have the categories above plus gasoline and other fuels which must NOT be counted in the ballpark. The total sum is about 41% minus these two categories we do have about 29 %.

3) finally, 23% of the chart over 29 % of the graph we do have: 0.23*0.29=0.667 which is about 7%

The answer must be A

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Re: Parabola

taureanamir wrote:

The equation of the parabola shown in the figure is y = 2x – x^2

The book says answer is B. B is greater. But how??

[img]

Attachment:

14233852_10153688722265563_1487696121_o.jpg

[/img]

Qty A
t

Qty B
2s-s^2

Hi taureanamir,

Quantity B can be rewritten as y as \(2s-s^2\) =\(y(s)\). Now from the figure t < y as point (s,t) is inside the parabola and x-axis.

Hence B is greater.

PS: Please share the source of the question.

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Re: q is an integer greater than 1. Let q stand for the smalles

Carcass wrote:

\(s\) is an integer greater than 1. Let \(\circledS\) stand for the smallest positive integer factor of q that is greater than 1.

Quantity A

Quantity B

\(\circledS\)

\(\circledS^3\)

A) Quantity A is greater.
B) Quantity B is greater.
C) The two quantities are equal.
D) The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

Ok, why they are equal??

Now q is an integer greater than 1.
\(\circledS\) is the smallest factor of q.
Ans \(\circledS^3\) should be the smallest factor of \(q^3\).
In both cases the answer will be \(\circledS\) only as all factors of q will also be factors of q^3.

However I do agree question is not very well framed.

Ok, I think maybe I see the issue? The problem states \(s\) is an integer greater than 1. But you’ve said q is an integer greater than one. Am I missing some relationship here or should the first statement be changed from s to q? On my screen I am seeing “\(s\) is an integer greater than 1.” In fact its part of your quote as well.

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Re: 30% of 50 is what fraction of 75% of 80?

Carcass wrote:

30% of 50 is what fraction of 75% of 80?

\(\frac{1}{4}\)

Original question: 30% of 50 is what fraction of 75% of 80?
Evaluate to get: 6 is what fraction of 60?

6/60 = 1/10
So, 6 is 1/10 of 60

Answer: 1/10

Cheers,
Brent
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Re: The 20 people at a party are divided into n mutually exclusi

HarveyKlaus wrote:

The 20 people at a party are divided into n mutually exclusive groups in such a way that the number of people in any group does not exceed the number in any other group by more than 1.

Quantity A: The value of n if at least one of the groups consists of 3 people
Quantity B: 6

Let’s first see what happens when n = 6
We could divide the 20 people into 6 groups as follows: 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4
So, n COULD equal 6.
This means the correct answer is either C or D

Are there other possible values of n that satisfy the given conditions?
For example, can n = 7?
Well, we could divide the 20 people into 7 groups as follows: 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 2
So, n COULD equal 7.

This means the correct answer is

Cheers,
Brent
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Re: If 40 percent of the social science majors are females, ho

Carcass wrote:

Attachment:

GRE – powerprep student enrollment at a small college.jpg

If 40 percent of the social science majors are females, how many males are social science majors?

A. 120

B. 168

C. 220

D. 252

E. 372

Explanation::

Total students (Male + Female) = 1400

Percentage of the students in social science majors = 30% = 0.3 * 1400 = 420 students

Out of 420 students 40% are female i.e. = 0.4 * 420 = 168

Male students = 420 – 168 = 252
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Re: The volume of a right circular cylinder with radius an

Carcass wrote:

Quantity A

Quantity B

The volume of a right circular cylinder
with radius and height each equal to 3

84

A) Quantity A is greater.
B) Quantity B is greater.
C) The two quantities are equal.
D) The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

Volume of cylinder = (pi)(radius²)(height)
= (pi)(3²)(3)
= (pi)(9)(3)
= (pi)(27)
≈ (3.14)(27)
≈ 84.78
NOTE: Since the value of Quantity A is so close to 84, you’ll probably need to use your onscreen calculator.

So, we get:
Quantity A: 84.78
Quantity B: 84

Answer: A

Cheers,
Brent
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Re: BD is parallel to AE.

Pria wrote:

Explain Please

Here given BD is parallel to AE,

so angle CBD = angle CAE, and angle BDC = angle AEC.

Therefore the triangles BCD and ACE are similar (Angle C is common to both triangles and by AAA triangle BCD and triangle ACE are similar)

Now it is given side BC = x , AB = y and AC =x+w.

side CD = y, DE = z and CE = y+Z

Now as both triangles BCD and ACE are similar

therfore we have

\(\frac{CB}{CA}\) = \(\frac{CD}{CE}\)

substitute the values we get

\(\frac{x}{(x+w)}\)= \(\frac{y}{(y+z)}\)

or x(y+z) = y(x+w)

or xy + xz = xy + wy

or xz = wy. So option C.
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Re: x 12

Of course, x can be negative. And when x is negative, y – x will always be larger than y. You can pick specific number to see what happens.(12 – -1) > 12
Hope it helps.

P/s: You should know the principle as follows

A > B (A – B > 0)
C > D (C – D > 0)
–> plus 2 inequalities, we have
A – D > B – C

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Re: In which of the following scenarios is p>q?

Sawant91 wrote:

In which of the following scenarios is p>q?

Indicate all possible scenarios.
A. \((0.11)^p>(0.11)^q\)
B. \(1^p>1^q\)
C. \((1.11)^p>(1.11)^q\)
D. \((1.01)^p>(1.01)^q\)
E. \((p+q)(p−q)>0\)
F. \(|p|>|q|\)

So where are the variables p and q – they are used as exponent or power..
some rules for the terms when the base is positive..
1) when the number, say x, is between 0 and 1 that is 0<x<1…
Higher the power, lower the value so x^3<x^2
2) when x=1
the values are always same irrespective of the power. 1^7 = 1^1
3) when x>1
Higher the power , higher the value so x^3>x^2

now let us see the choices..
A. \((0.11)^p>(0.11)^q\)…..0<0.11<1 so case (1) p<q
B. \(1^p>1^q\)………. case (2).. cannot be determined
C. \((1.11)^p>(1.11)^q\)…….1.11>1, so case (3).. p>q
D. \((1.01)^p>(1.01)^q\)…….1.01>1, so case (3).. p>q
E. \((p+q)(p−q)>0…….p^2-q^2>0…..p^2>q^2\), we can just say |p|>|q|… say p is negative (-3)^2>2^2 but -3<2, so p<q and if both positive p>q
F. \(|p|>|q|\)…. same as E above

thus only C and D

hope it helps
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Some useful Theory.
1. Arithmetic and Geometric progressions : https://greprepclub.com/forum/progressions-arithmetic-geometric-and-harmonic-11574.html#p27048
2. Effect of Arithmetic Operations on fraction : https://greprepclub.com/forum/effects-of-arithmetic-operations-on-fractions-11573.html?sid=d570445335a783891cd4d48a17db9825
3. Remainders : https://greprepclub.com/forum/remainders-what-you-should-know-11524.html
4. Number properties : https://greprepclub.com/forum/number-property-all-you-require-11518.html
5. Absolute Modulus and Inequalities : https://greprepclub.com/forum/absolute-modulus-a-better-understanding-11281.html

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