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5 Tips for Acceptance to a Physician Assistant Program

Tips for acceptance to a PA program

Tips for acceptance to a PA program

Over the years, I’ve helped many students get accepted into Physician Assistant (PA) Programs across the country. To apply to PA programs, you will use the Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA). To help you send in an application that effectively presents your qualifications, I’m including five tips below to ensure that you, too, will be successful in applying:

1. Review the CASPA Application BEFORE you apply as part of your preparation.
In order to strategize, it’s helpful to review all sections of the application so that you can make careful decisions about how you will approach each one and how you will set yourself apart as an applicant. Create a to-do list with a timeline that is realistic for your schedule.

2. After identifying the programs that you want to apply to, check each individual program’s requirements because they vary.
Before you begin taking the prerequisite coursework, double check the websites for the schools where you are interested in applying. If you have already taken your coursework, confirm that you have met these requirements before submitting your application.

3. Make sure your recommenders meet the recommender requirements for the schools you are applying to, and request the letters of recommendation early.
Different schools will require different combinations of letters. For example, if a program requires a letter from a PA on your behalf, do not apply to that school if you can’t find a PA to write a letter for you. It’s worth taking the time to check what the letter requirements are, because they could limit the number of schools you apply to.

4. Order a copy of your transcript, and review it before you order copies to be mailed to each program.
It’s important to review a copy of your transcript for errors. They happen. Give yourself enough time to correct any errors before you need to order copies to submit to CASPA. The transcripts should be mailed four weeks before your deadline. It takes that same length of time for your application to be processed before it can be mailed to each individual program.

5. Begin working on your application essays early.
Since these essays represent you, take the time to make sure they offer a true reflection of your character. Since it can seem overwhelming to decide what details to include or what to highlight about your background, working with an expert admissions consultant like me and my colleagues at Accepted can give you a significant advantage. I want my clients to be excited to submit their applications because they are so proud of the essays that they have written.

Be thoughtful with your essays and words, and carefully explain your background and reasons for applying. For assistance in these areas, contact me or my colleagues at Accepted.

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted admissions consultant specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

This article was originally posted on the Accepted Admissions Blog.

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Linda Abraham is the founder and CEO of Accepted, the top-tier admissions consultancy that helps you unlock your competitive advantage. For the last 20 years Linda and her highly credentialed, experienced team have helped thousands of applicants get accepted to top colleges and graduate schools worldwide. The Wall Street Journal, US News, and Poets & Quants, are among the publications who seek out her expertise.

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MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: I Have No International Experience

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: I Have No International Experience by mbaMission

What have you been told about applying to business school? With the advent of chat rooms, blogs, and forums, armchair “experts” often unintentionally propagate MBA admissions myths, which can linger and undermine an applicant’s confidence. Some applicants are led to believe that schools want a specific “type” of candidate and expect certain GRE scores and GPAs, for example. Others are led to believe that they need to know alumni from their target schools and/or get a letter of reference from the CEO of their firm in order to get in. In this series, mbaMission debunks these and other myths and strives to take the anxiety out of the admissions process.


In the past, we have addressed the prevailing MBA admissions myth that a “right” professional path exists for applicants to follow. Just as there is no ideal position to have pre-MBA, there is no ideal life experience either. International experience, for example, is not a prerequisite for admission to top programs, so a lack of international experience does not suddenly disqualify you.

One could fairly say that admissions officers want a geographically and experientially diverse class and that most MBA candidates these days have some international exposure, either through travel or work. However, keep in mind that international experience is not limited to physically being out of the country. If you are dealing with suppliers abroad or running a weekly conference call with a team in another country—even if you are an American dealing with this from the United States or an Indian managing these tasks from India—you still have international experience.

However, even if you are an American working for a U.S. company with a U.S.-based product or service and U.S.-based customers—as unlikely as that is these days—you are not applying with one hand tied behind your back. Again, there is no checklist at the Admissions Office. If you have not had the personal resources or the professional opportunities to gain international experience, you can still become a business leader—the two are not mutually exclusive. So, like all candidates, you will need to explain to the MBA admissions committee how your degree will help you achieve your dreams. Gaining an international education and international experience through your MBA may just be a crucial step in reaching your goals. 📝


Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - mbaMission LogombaMission is the leader in MBA admissions consulting with a full-time and comprehensively trained staff of consultants, all with profound communications and MBA experience. mbaMission has helped thousands of candidates fulfill their dream of attending prominent MBA programs around the world. Take your first step toward a more successful MBA application experience with a free 30-minute consultation with one of mbaMission’s senior consultants. Click here to sign up today.

The post MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: I Have No International Experience appeared first on GRE.

Fuente https://www.manhattanprep.com

How to Study for the GRE: The First Two Weeks (Part 2)

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - How to Study for the GRE: The First Two Weeks (Part 2) by Chelsey Cooley

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GRE courses absolutely free. Crazy, right? Check out our upcoming courses here.


Last time, we discussed how to learn more about the GRE and how to prepare yourself to study efficiently during your first two weeks. Now, let’s look at a few more sample study sessions. How you study matters—and that can make the difference between an okay GRE score and a great one.

Sample Session 2: Vocabulary Flashcards

In order to conquer the GRE, you’ll need to learn some new vocabulary. If you’re taking a Manhattan Prep GRE course, start with the vocabulary list that you get each week in your syllabus. If you aren’t, you could pick up the Essential GRE Vocabulary flashcards, or you could even begin by jotting down unfamiliar vocabulary words from practice problems.

For each of the words on your list, make a high-quality flashcard. This article will teach you how to make a flashcard really memorable by using colorful imagery. Try it out! Take your time while making your flashcards—being thorough now will save you time later.

Once you’ve made your flashcards, don’t just read them and try to remember them one by one. Instead, take advantage of the way that your brain naturally prefers to learn. For instance, here’s a great rundown of a sample study session using vocab flashcards. And here’s a primer on spaced retrieval, which is an efficient technique for learning lots of new vocabulary quickly.

Followup: Spaced Retrieval

Spaced retrieval is the process of coming back to each vocabulary word multiple times, trying to remember it for longer and longer periods each time. Never completely set aside words that you’ve studied in the past. When you’re first learning a new word, look at your flashcard frequently. But when you think you’ve completely memorized the word, don’t just set it aside. Instead, put it in a special set of flashcards that you only check every couple of weeks. Put a note on your calendar to remind yourself to look at those cards periodically and test your memory.

Sample Session 3: Building Your Math Foundations

It might have been years, or even decades, since your last math class. If that’s the case, you’ll need to rebuild your “math sense” from the ground up. Here are some study sessions that will help you do that.

If you only have a little time, try one or two of these basic exercises. They might seem simple, but they’ll only take a few minutes and will help you get used to working with numbers again.

  • Write out your times tables (from 2 up to 12) as quickly as possible. Time yourself, then do it again and try to beat your time.
  • Write down the numbers from 1 to 100 on a sheet of paper, then list the factors and prime factors of each number.
  • Play a few rounds of the Zetamac Arithmetic Game, or the games at mental-math-trainer.com.
  • You can even search online for middle school math worksheets—these will have the types of content that you’ll need to be very comfortable with on the GRE.

If you have a little more time to work, focus on the GRE Strategy Guides. Don’t just read the math guides passively, though. Try making “when I see this, do this” flashcards as you read. A good target is to make at least five of these flashcards per chapter, although some chapters will have many more!

Followup: Cheat Sheets

When you finish a chapter of one of the GRE Strategy Guides, you aren’t done with that topic! Wait a week or two, then revisit that chapter. This time, create a cheat sheet that summarizes the most important points.

Sample Session 4: Using the 5lb. Book of GRE Practice Problems

When you took your first practice GRE, or as you started studying, you probably noticed weaknesses in some areas. The 5lb. Book of GRE Practice Problems is a great resource for addressing weaknesses. However, you should be thoughtful about how you use it. It’s tempting to do each problem, then read the explanation, then do the next problem, then read the next explanation, and so on. However, that’s not the most efficient use of your time. Instead, when you do problems out of the 5lb. Book, do three things. One, always do sets of problems with a timer, rather than doing a single problem at a time. Two, when you review the problems, use the method described in this article rather than just reading the explanations. Three, put every single problem, right or wrong, into your problem log.

Followup: Reviewing Your Problem Log

Set aside one study session every week just to review the problems you’ve done over the previous week. Get in the habit of marking (in your problem log) interesting problems that you’d like to redo. When you redo them, try to do them faster than you did previously, or try to avoid whatever mistake you made the first time. If you get a problem right the second time, nice work! You’ve learned something useful. If you get it wrong again, that may indicate that you need more work on that problem type.

What Next?

Use any or all of these study sessions as you start preparing for the GRE. Once you’ve spent the first two weeks reviewing the basics, you’ll be ready to take your second practice test. You probably won’t do as well on the second practice test as you will on your official GRE—but it can provide you with extremely useful information. Next time, we’ll take a look at how to approach that practice test, and how to review it afterwards. 📝


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Chelsey CooleyChelsey Cooley Manhattan Prep GRE Instructor is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Seattle, Washington. Chelsey always followed her heart when it came to her education. Luckily, her heart led her straight to the perfect background for GMAT and GRE teaching: she has undergraduate degrees in mathematics and history, a master’s degree in linguistics, a 790 on the GMAT, and a perfect 170Q/170V on the GRE. Check out Chelsey’s upcoming GRE prep offerings here.

The post How to Study for the GRE: The First Two Weeks (Part 2) appeared first on GRE.

Fuente https://www.manhattanprep.com

The Perils of Half-Remembered GRE Vocab Words

Manhattan Prep GMAT Blog - The Perils of Half-Forgotten GRE Vocab Words by Tom Anderson

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GRE courses absolutely free. Crazy, right? Check out our upcoming courses here.


I’m going to give you two options. Which do you think would be more beneficial for your GRE Verbal score?

1) You are granted the ability (via some kind of magic lightning bolt) to memorize 500 GRE vocab words instantly with really thorough definitions.

2) You are granted the ability (via some similar magic bolt) to memorize the gist of 1000 GRE vocab words instantly.

So which would you choose—fewer words memorized in detail or more words memorized halfway?

In my years teaching the GRE, this is actually something I’ve put a little thought into. Of course, there are no magic bolts (that I know of) which enable you to instantly memorize GRE vocab words. But every GRE student does face a similar dilemma: is it better to memorize more words sloppily or fewer words with greater precision?

If I had a choice like the one above, I’d choose option #1, hands-down. In my opinion, 500 really solid definitions are a lot more useful than 1000 tenuous definitions.  

Why? Because the people who make the GRE Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence questions deliberately test you on the nuances of definitions. A half-definition is usually more dangerous than no definition at all.

I. What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You (But What You Halfway Know Can Hurt You Worse)

Here’s a little quiz. Pause for a second, stop reading the article, and write down the clearest definitions of these GRE vocab words you’re able to conjure. If you don’t have paper around… at least state a definition to yourself and try to remember the terms you used.

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - The Perils of Half-Remembered GRE Vocab Words by Tom Anderson

Now compare your results with these, taken from Google Dictionary. The accuracy of a definition is not a matter of black-and-white or right-or-wrong. Think of yours falling somewhere on a spectrum of accuracy. Where did they fall? Mostly accurate? Halfway there? Totally unknown?

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - The Perils of Half-Remembered GRE Vocab Words by Tom Anderson

It is most definitely a good practice to push as many GRE vocab words as possible toward the green end of this spectrum. If you can use a word fluently, then you’ll likely know whether or not it fits a given fill-in-the-blank question. That said, we all have limited time and resources. Inevitably, many of the ~1,000,000 words that make up the English language will elude us. You don’t need to memorize all of the words and you don’t need to get all of them to the point of perfection.  

In your vocabulary memorization practice, though, you should not let words sit in the “red zone” outlined above. Words partly known are often more harmful than words you don’t know at all.

To illustrate, look at the results of a couple of “students” doing the same little exercise you just did. We’ve got Beauregard’s and Antoine’s answers to the same little mini-quiz listed below:

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - The Perils of Half-Remembered GRE Vocab Words by Tom Anderson

It might be tempting to think that Beauregard has a slight edge on his GRE exam, but I’d argue that his answers are much more problematic than Antoine’s. Admitting you don’t know is much better than faking it. Beauregard scribbled out some half-answers and complete guesses; in the process, he whipped up some truly nebulous concoctions: fragments of connotations swirled into a cocktail of forgotten contexts and misremembered details.  

Such half-remembered definitions are more likely to be harmful to your GRE Verbal score. Here are a few reasons why:

1) Connotations matter: The GRE loves to test you on the nuances of words. Especially in Sentence Equivalence.

2) Denotations matter: The GRE loves to test you on precise definitions—and it often tests you on less-common second and third definitions too.

3) Context matters: The GRE also loves to test you on the idiomatic usage of words. Practice the “correct” use of those words in context.

4) Finally, and most importantly, GRE vocab words you don’t know at all can become strategic wildcards. It’s tempting to choose a word you half-know by “forcing” it to fit the blank in the sentence. If you admit that you don’t know, you won’t be lulled into picking a half-known word that you’re more comfortable with.

II. Embrace the Wildcard

GRE vocab words you don’t know become strategic wildcards. Consider, for example, this mockup of a Text Completion question:

After a long day of toilsome labor in the fields, the farmer’s energy level deteriorated and she felt quite ________________.

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - The Perils of Half-Remembered GRE Vocab Words by Tom Anderson

Yeah, I know, that last word is in Chinese. And no, of course that won’t happen on the real exam, but humor me for a minute. Even though one word is in Chinese, I bet you can still get this question correct. Do any of the other words fit?

Working a long day in the fields does not usually make one excited or purple. Maybe you could make a case for sad, but there is no direct link to what the sentence is talking about. And the same goes for “angry.” There is no direct clue for any of those words in the sentence.

So what’s the right answer? Lei. It’s Chinese for “tired.” That’s a perfect fit for this sentence. Obviously you’d never be put in this position on the real exam—they don’t include other languages in the answer choices. Similar situations do arise on the GRE, though. Despite memorizing hundreds of GRE vocab words, you’ll likely encounter a few that you don’t know on the real exam. When you have a breakdown like this…

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - The Perils of Half-Remembered GRE Vocab Words by Tom Anderson
…pick the one you don’t know.

If you treat the unknown GRE vocab words like strategic “wildcards,” you’re still in a really good spot to get the questions correct. Pick the wildcard if you have no other word that makes a good fit.

Note that this only works if you admit what you don’t know. If, instead, you were in a situation like this…

After a long day of toilsome labor in the fields, the farmer’s energy level deteriorated and she felt quite ________________.

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - The Perils of Half-Remembered GRE Vocab Words by Tom Anderson
…it would be much harder to make an accurate guess. Even if the right word is still choice E, you’d be lost in a sea of half-definitions, tempted to pick something that sorta-kinda seemed like it should fit. And on the GRE, something that “seems right” usually results in wrong answers.

III. Bringing It Back to Reality

We’ve journeyed down a few hypothetical rabbit holes in this blog entry, so let’s bring it back to the actual test. Here’s a question from the Official Guide. It’s actually the “hardest” question in the entire book—only 10 percent of students got it correct when it was live on the real GRE exam. I bet that if you admit when you don’t know the meanings of words, you’ll have a pretty good shot of getting it right. Even if you’re able to eliminate one obviously wrong answer, your guessing odds will be significantly better than the percent of students who got it right when it was an actual test question. The key will lie in not letting yourself get lured in by a half-known word.

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - The Perils of Half-Remembered GRE Vocab Words by Tom Anderson

I bet you know the word “irrelevant.”  

You may know the word “frivolous” too.  

Don’t try to answer the question based on half-knowledge of the other words. Try to admit it: either you know them or you don’t.  

Can you be both “irrelevant” and “worthy of attention” at the same time?

No.

And can you be both “frivolous” and “worthy of attention” at the same time?

Also no.

If that doesn’t sit well with you, go look up “frivolous” and “irrelevant.” There is an element of the definitions you must be missing.

If you know it, you can rule out “didactic” in a similar way. “Intended to teach” has no relation to the clothing descriptions being mentioned. And “syntactical” fails as well. We are not discussing grammar or word order here. The only choice left is “sartorial.” Pick it. It’s the correct answer.  

What does sartorial mean? Who cares. If you picked it, you just got the question right.

…Okay, maybe you care a little bit. Look up the definition of sartorial here. Sure enough, it’s a perfect fit for the sentence.

One way or another, remember the big point: You don’t have to know all the GRE vocab words on the test, but don’t try to fake it if you don’t really know the word.  

Now get out there and start moving a few more words from the “red zone” further to the right in your vocabulary spectrum! And if you hear of any magic vocab memorization lightning bolts out there, choose wisely. 📝


Want more guidance from our GRE gurus? You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GRE courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. Check out our upcoming courses here.


tom-andersonTom Anderson is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in New York, NY. He has a B.A. in English and a master’s degree in education. Tom has long possessed an understanding of the power of standardized tests in propelling one’s education and career, and he hopes he can help his students see through the intimidating veneer of the GRE. Check out Tom’s upcoming GRE courses here.

The post The Perils of Half-Remembered GRE Vocab Words appeared first on GRE.

Fuente https://www.manhattanprep.com

GRE Best Practices Leading Up to Test Day

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - GRE Best Practices Leading Up to Test Day by Daniel Yudkin

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GRE courses absolutely free. Ready to take the plunge? Check out our upcoming courses here.


So. You’ve put in the hours. You’ve studied for weeks. You’ve practiced Vocab, drilled Sentence Equivalence, memorized your right triangles, learned your equations. You can calculate the area of a circle at the drop of a hat.

Now all you have to do is take the test.

As you approach test day, there are several GRE best practices to keep in mind that can help to optimize your performance.

1) Don’t Cram

The best way to study for the GRE is at a medium pace, diligently and with discipline, over the course of 8-12 weeks. By the time you are done studying, you will need to have spent at least 100 hours studying. People who show the most improvement will end up studying 200 hours or more. There is a direct relationship between the amount of time you spend studying and the amount your score will improve. There is no way you will be able to put in those hours in the final few days leading up to the test. In fact, burning yourself out in the days before the test is likely to lead to reduced performance, since you will be tired and drained and you probably will find yourself obsessing over a single topic when you should instead be maintaining a broad overview of the content.

2) Plan Carefully

While it will be impossible to learn all the content of the test in the weeks leading up to test day, that doesn’t mean that those last few weeks aren’t critical. This is the period when you cement in your mind all the things you’ve learned throughout your studying and build your confidence in such a way that you feel prepared and ready to tackle the test. You should carefully map out your study schedule for at least three weeks leading up to the test.

At about 2 weeks out, you should take your first ETS practice test. This will give you a fairly solid sense of where you stand. If this score is nowhere near where you want it to be, this is an opportunity to ask yourself: Did I really study my hardest? Could I do better? If the answers to these questions are No and then Yes, then you may want to consider postponing the exam or taking it merely for practice. Ideally, you will walk into the testing room on test day ready to do your best on the first try. It is far better to go in there and get it over with on the first attempt than to draw it out and make the studying process longer than it needs to be.

After taking ETS practice test #1, it’s time to review. You have a week to go through this test carefully and learn it inside and out. Thoroughly reviewing and understanding all the questions in each practice test is one of the best ways to build mastery in the final weeks leading up to the test.

At 1 week out, take practice test #2. This will be your final round of practice and review. Once again, go through all the problems in the week leading up to the exam and make sure you understand all the places you went wrong, as well as celebrating any victories that you had so that you can repeat them on the day of the test.

In the final few days, continue to review your old exams. Go through problems from old tests that you’ve seen before, but haven’t seen in a while. They should be vaguely familiar, but not so familiar that you remember the answer. This will build a sense of fluency with the problems and motivate you as you go into the test.

3) Maintain Perspective

Remember that the GRE is only one part of a rich, multi-faceted application. While your score on this test is undeniably important, since it is perhaps the only aspect of the application on which everyone is on an equal playing field, there are a variety of other ways to shine. Putting effort into your personal essays will allow your unique perspective and experience to show through. In addition, recommendations from previous bosses and employers should not be overlooked. This is one of the best ways for admissions committees to get a sense of your unique skills and contributions.

After test day, there are several things to keep in mind. First, remember you can always retake the test. Thanks to a revised policy implemented by ETS a few years ago, test-takers can now decide which of their GRE scores they want to send to institutions. Any score you don’t like, you don’t have to send. So if you find yourself having an off day, it’s not set in stone.

Finally, believe it or not, you may find yourself benefitting from some of the skills you learned while studying for the GRE in other aspects of your life. For example, the skills required in the argument essay, in which you critique a statement and suggest ways the argument is flawed, are extremely important in many aspects of life and work. This is just one of many ways that the GRE can be helpful in areas outside of the test-taking arena.

So: enjoy sounding smart to your friends, tearing down false arguments, and mentally calculating tips for the rest of your life. Good luck! 📝

The post GRE Best Practices Leading Up to Test Day appeared first on GRE.

Fuente https://www.manhattanprep.com

MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: I Have a Gap in My Resume

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: I Have a Gap in My Resume by mbaMission

What have you been told about applying to business school? With the advent of chat rooms, blogs, and forums, armchair “experts” often unintentionally propagate MBA admissions myths, which can linger and undermine an applicant’s confidence. Some applicants are led to believe that schools want a specific “type” of candidate and expect certain GRE scores and GPAs, for example. Others are led to believe that they need to know alumni from their target schools and/or get a letter of reference from the CEO of their firm in order to get in. In this series, mbaMission debunks these and other myths and strives to take the anxiety out of the admissions process.


The perfect MBA applicant does not exist. However, a perception of the perfect applicant does—an individual who is scaling greater and greater personal, community, and professional peaks unabated until he/she finally applies to business school. So, those who take time off at any point perceive themselves as disadvantaged. They worry that the admissions committees will see the gap(s) in their resume and dismiss them outright. After all, they probably have numerous more determined individuals they could admit, right?

Time off can be destructive, true. If you spent a year sitting on your couch watching reality TV, you may be in trouble. If you have a strong professional history and spent one month between jobs sitting on your couch watching reality TV, your record should still speak for itself. But even if you do take (or have taken) an extended leave, as long as you are productive during that time and grow personally, you should still be just fine. In fact, an adventure may even add to your story and help you differentiate yourself.

If you spend six months or a year traveling before you start your professional career, you are certainly still eligible for a top MBA program. If you take personal leave to care for a family member, do charity work, or even pursue a personal passion—an art form, for example—as long as you can show purpose and reveal a broad record of competency, an admissions officer should still see your merits. Admissions officers are—and this may be surprising to some—human beings. They understand that applicants are not robots and that they have interests, passions, and personal lives. If you make good use of your time, they will not condemn you. They just might envy you. 📝


Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - mbaMission LogombaMission is the leader in MBA admissions consulting with a full-time and comprehensively trained staff of consultants, all with profound communications and MBA experience. mbaMission has helped thousands of candidates fulfill their dream of attending prominent MBA programs around the world. Take your first step toward a more successful MBA application experience with a free 30-minute consultation with one of mbaMission’s senior consultants. Click here to sign up today.

The post MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: I Have a Gap in My Resume appeared first on GRE.

Fuente https://www.manhattanprep.com

How to Study for the GRE: The First Two Weeks (Part 1)

Manhattan Prep GRE Blog - How to Study for the GRE: The First Two Weeks (Part 1) by Chelsey Cooley

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GRE courses absolutely free. Crazy, right? Check out our upcoming courses here.


Not sure where to start? Here’s how to handle the first two weeks of your GRE journey.

Day 1: Learn the format.

If you’re just getting started now, take a day to learn the problem types on the GRE. There are quick descriptions of all of the problem types in the Official Guide to the GRE, and also on the official GRE website here.

Day 2: Take a practice test.

Here’s a link to a free practice GRE. If you’re pressed for time, you can skip the two Analytical Writing sections at the beginning. Make sure that you take all of the Quant and Verbal sections, though. The point isn’t to get a great score! The point is to learn, through hands-on experience, what the test looks and feels like.

Day 3: Choose your GRE study style.

At this point, you could sign up for a GRE course. One huge advantage to the course is structure: you won’t have to make as many tough decisions about what to study and when to study it. If you take a course, you’ll be able to skip a lot of the planning described in this article. But if you go for self-study instead, you’ll want to have these resources:

Day 4: Start a problem log and a study calendar.

Here’s how to create a problem log. For your study calendar, plan out one week at a time, and be realistic. Build in plenty of time to review. A reasonable target for official problems is about 10-12 problems in an hour. You’ll spend 10-25 minutes doing the problem set, then take a quick break, then spend the rest of the hour reviewing.

What you put on your study calendar will depend on your priorities. In the next article in this series, I’ll share a couple of sample study sessions for your first two weeks. You can use any or all of them, in any order (as long as you regularly return to previous topics to review!). They’ll cover a few of the highest-value topics on the GRE at a basic level and will prepare you for your second practice test.

For now, I’ll leave you with one of my favorite GRE study sessions: the ‘half-section.’

Sample Session 1: GRE Half-Sections

Each Quant or Verbal section of the GRE consists of 20 questions. (You’ll have 35 minutes for a Quant section and 30 minutes for a Verbal section.) Each section always has a predictable number of questions of each type. In a Quant section, there will be approximately 7 Quantitative Comparison problems, 10 Discrete Quant problems, and 3 Data Interpretation problems. In a Verbal section, there will be about 6 Text Completion problems, 4 Sentence Equivalence problems, and 10 Reading Comprehension problems.

A half-section is exactly what it sounds like: a simulated GRE section, half as long as the real thing (to give you more time for review and keep you from wearing out). Here’s what a half-section should contain:

  • Quant (17.5 minutes):
    • 3 Quantitative Comparison
    • 5 Discrete Quant
    • 2 Data Interpretation
  • Verbal (15 minutes):
    • 3 Text Completion
    • 4 Sentence Equivalence
    • 5 Reading Comprehension

Start by choosing your problems. The easiest way to select problems for a half-section is by using the 5lb. Book of GRE Practice Problems. To create a Verbal section, choose the problems at random from the Text Completion, Sentence Equivalence, and Reading Comprehension chapters of the book. Jot down the problem numbers and keep them next to you.

Since most of the Quant materials in the 5lb. Book are divided up by topic, it’s a little harder to choose random problem sets. You can use the Quant Diagnostic at the very front of the book, which contains mixed Quant problems. You can also flip to random pages in the book and select random problem numbers, or use the problems from the Official Guide to the GRE, which cover a variety of topics.  

Once you have your problem numbers written down, start your timer and get working. Treat the half-set exactly how you’d treat the real GRE: don’t take breaks or get distracted, and if you find a problem that you can’t solve, guess and move on. Give yourself 17.5 minutes for a Quant section or 15 minutes for a Verbal section; feel free to add 1 minute for the time it’ll take to flip back and forth between problems in the book.

Followup: Reviewing Your Half-Section

A half-section is a good study tool for two reasons. One, it helps you diagnose weaknesses that you may not have known about. Two, it helps you prepare for some of the most difficult aspects of the GRE: time management, quickly recognizing problem types, and making smart guesses. Every time you do a half-section, review it with those two ideas in mind. At a high level: did you make smart strategic decisions? At the level of individual problems: what can you learn from each of the problems you did? If you discover a new weakness, add a study session or two to your calendar to address it.

If any of the problems from the half-section were especially interesting, mark them in your problem log. Return to those problems a week from now and try them again.

What Next?

In the next article in this series, I’ll share a few more sample study sessions for your first two to three weeks of GRE studies. Then, we’ll cover what happens during, and after, your second practice test. For now, if you’re just getting started, take some time to structure your studies! You’ll thank yourself for it later on, when you have a strong foundation and good study habits. 📝


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Chelsey CooleyChelsey Cooley Manhattan Prep GRE Instructor is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Seattle, Washington. Chelsey always followed her heart when it came to her education. Luckily, her heart led her straight to the perfect background for GMAT and GRE teaching: she has undergraduate degrees in mathematics and history, a master’s degree in linguistics, a 790 on the GMAT, and a perfect 170Q/170V on the GRE. Check out Chelsey’s upcoming GRE prep offerings here.

The post How to Study for the GRE: The First Two Weeks (Part 1) appeared first on GRE.

Fuente https://www.manhattanprep.com

Approaching the Diversity Essay Question

Accepted-Approaching the Diversity Essay Question

Accepted-Approaching the Diversity Essay Question

Many applications now have a question, sometimes optional, encouraging people with minority backgrounds, unusual educational histories, or unusual family histories to write about their background.

How Are YOU Diverse?

First the easy answer: If you are an immigrant to the US, the child of immigrants, or someone whose ethnicity is considered a minority in the US, you might find this question an interesting one to show how your background will add to the mix of perspectives at the program you are applying to.

Of course if you’re not a minority and don’t fall into one of those categories – and those are elements that you have no control over, so you can’t just jump into one of those categories – that doesn’t mean that you don’t have anything to write about. If you are applying to school after having an unusual experience for applicants, like serving in the military, becoming part of a dance troupe, or caring for disabled relative, you can use your experience to evoke the way in which you will bring diversity to campus.

Why Does Diversity Matter?

The more diverse perspectives found in the classroom, throughout the dorms, in the dining halls, and mixed into study groups, the richer the discussions will be and the more creative the teams will become. Plus, learning and growing in this multicultural environment will prepare students for working in our increasingly multicultural and global world.

Different Ways to Show Your Diversity

When guiding our clients in highlighting their diversity, we discuss their family’s culture, traditions, and perhaps challenges they faced as a result of their country’s or ethnicity’s geo-political and economic situation. We then advise them to highlight how these distinctive aspects of their background and experience have influenced their development and character. Our clients learn to focus their applications on the unusual and distinctive experiences that have shaped them.

Here are a few examples that can help you do the same:

  1. You grew up with a strong insistence on respecting elders, attending family events, or learning your parents’ native language and culture.
     
  2. You are close to grandparents and extended family who have taught you how teamwork can help everyone survive.
     
  3. You have had to face and deal with difficulties that stem from your parents’ values being in conflict with those of your peers.
     
  4. Teachers have not always understood the elements of your culture or outside-of-school situation, and how they pertain to your school performance.
     
  5. You suffered from discrimination, and formed your values and personality traits around your success in spite of the discrimination.
     
  6. You learned skills from a lifestyle that is outside the norm – living in foreign countries as the child of diplomats or contractors, performing professionally in theater, dance, music, or sports, or communicating with a deaf sibling.

It’s not just about who your parents are. It’s about who you are – to the core. Your background, your influences, your religious observances, your language, your ideas, your work environment, your community experiences – all of these factors come together to create a unique individual, an individual who can contribute to a diverse class and a diverse world.

Writing about Diversity

At Accepted, we advise our clients that their diversity essay should focus on how their experiences have built their empathy for others, their resilience, their character, and their ideas. Ask yourself: WHO are you? WHAT have you done? HOW do you think? These elements will serve as the framework for your essay.

Remember: You don’t need to be a tightrope walker living in the Andes to pass the diversity test. You need to have invested yourself in the world of diversity – to have lived and breathed uniqueness – in order to write successfully about how you will contribute to your school’s diverse population.

Click here to get your Diversity Checklist, a tool we’ve created to help you understand how you fit into the diversity mosaic and what you can do to best express your unique qualities to the adcom.

This article was originally posted on the Accepted Admissions Blog.

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About Linda Abraham

Linda Abraham is the founder and CEO of Accepted, the top-tier admissions consultancy that helps you unlock your competitive advantage. For the last 20 years Linda and her highly credentialed, experienced team have helped thousands of applicants get accepted to top colleges and graduate schools worldwide. The Wall Street Journal, US News, and Poets & Quants, are among the publications who seek out her expertise.

Taking the GRE in Nigeria

With nearly 4,000 tests administered in 2016, Nigeria ranks 10th amongst countries with the most GRE-takers. Below we’ll be discussing everything you need to know to take the GRE in Nigeria, including information on testing centers, registration, and fees.

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Taking the Computer-Based GRE in Nigeria

The computer-based GRE is offered by five testing centers spread across three cities within Nigeria:

Abuja

Jos

Lagos

Testing is offered year-round at these locations. However, each center typically only offers one to two test dates per month, so it’s important to find a date and location that meets your requirements. You can use ETS’s Find Test Centers and Dates tool to see the exact availability. Once you’ve found a place and time that works, visit ETS’s website to view instructions for online or phone registration.

Taking the Paper-Based GRE in Nigeria

The paper-based exam is also administered at two locations in Nigeria for those with limited computer access:

Aba

  • Dority International Secondary School
    Test Center Code: 10068

Benin City

  • Edo House/Debyl Ltd
    Test Center Code: 10058

The paper-based exam is offered far less frequently than the computer GRE—there are only three potential dates to take the paper test each year. Exact dates vary, but they typically occur in early February, early October, and early November. To sign up for the paper-based exam, you can create an online account and follow these directions from ETS. Alternatively, you can print and mail ETS’s Registration Form for the Paper-delivered GRE.

Cost and Fees for Taking the GRE in Nigeria

ETS lists all fees for the GRE on their website. At a minimum, test-takers will need to pay a registration fee of 205 USD (around 74,000 NGN at the time of this writing). Please select your test date carefully, as rescheduling will incur a 50 USD fee.

Once you have your scores, the first four score reports you send are free. To send any score reports beyond these, you’ll need to pay 27 USD to the ETS for each additional score report. If you believe there was an error in the judgment of your writing (AWA) section, you may request a re-grading for 60 USD.

Please note, as ETS mentions here, only Visa, PayPal and voucher numbers are accepted as payment for those looking to take the GRE in Nigeria.

Taking the GRE in Nigeria: Conclusion

Taking the GRE in Nigeria is really no different than taking it in any other part of the world. And like anywhere else, you’ll want to be properly prepared for the exam before you walk through the test center’s doors! Consider signing up with Magoosh as you embark upon your test prep journey, and good luck!

Magoosh students score 12 points better than average on the GRE. Click here to learn more!

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Tyler Johnson

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About Tyler Johnson

As a member of Magoosh’s student help team, Tyler shepherds students through the gauntlet of test prep. He holds a BS in Music from USC and discovered a passion for education while earning a master’s in Electronic Media at SFSU. When he’s not defining esoteric words or explaining combinatorics, he likes to make music and play soccer.